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Keith Weiss Geological Laboratories – Room 100

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August 2018

Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Hejun Zhu – UT Dallas

August 23, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm CDT

Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Hejun Zhu Department of Geosciences, The University of Texas at Dallas Abstract Title: Mapping mantle flows underneath - North America and Caribbean Abstract: In this talk, I will present a new 3-D azimuthally anisotropic model, namely US32, for the North American and Caribbean Plates. This model is constrained by using seismic data from USArray and full waveform inversion technology. The inversion uses data from 180 regional earthquakes recorded by 4,516 seismographic stations, resulting in 586,185…

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AAPG RIGS 2018

August 24, 2018 @ 11:30 am - 1:00 pm CDT
|Recurring Event (See all)

One event on August 29, 2018 at 4:00 pm

One event on August 30, 2018 at 5:00 pm

Rice University AAPG Students'' Chapter presents RIGS 2018: Mark the dates! August 24- Resume/CV writing workshop: 12 noon (Lunch will be served at 11.30 AM on EEPS Patio) August 29- Meet Industry professionals, learn the current state of job opportunities in oil/gas sector, resumé review by industry professionals and panel discussion: 4-6 PM (KWL 100) August 30- Poster and networking session: 5-6.30 PM (Reception at EEPS Patio) Make the most out of AAPG RIGS 2018!

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AAPG RIGS 2018

August 29, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm CDT
|Recurring Event (See all)

One event on August 29, 2018 at 4:00 pm

One event on August 30, 2018 at 5:00 pm

Rice University AAPG Students'' Chapter presents RIGS 2018: Mark the dates! August 24- Resume/CV writing workshop: 12 noon (Lunch will be served at 11.30 AM on EEPS Patio) August 29- Meet Industry professionals, learn the current state of job opportunities in oil/gas sector, resumé review by industry professionals and panel discussion: 4-6 PM (KWL 100) August 30- Poster and networking session: 5-6.30 PM (Reception at EEPS Patio) Make the most out of AAPG RIGS 2018!

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Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Katie Stack Morgan – NASA – JPL

August 30, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm CDT

Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Katie Stack Morgan - NASA - JPL Abstract Title:  The Mars 2020 Rover: Seeking Signs of Past Life on Mars Abstract: In 2020, NASA will launch the next flagship rover mission to Mars. The Mars 2020 mission seeks to explore ancient habitable environments, seek signs of ancient life, enable the collection of a set of samples that could one day be returned to Earth, and prepare for human exploration of Mars. In this talk, Mars…

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AAPG RIGS 2018

August 30, 2018 @ 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm CDT
|Recurring Event (See all)

One event on August 29, 2018 at 4:00 pm

One event on August 30, 2018 at 5:00 pm

Rice University AAPG Students'' Chapter presents RIGS 2018: Mark the dates! August 24- Resume/CV writing workshop: 12 noon (Lunch will be served at 11.30 AM on EEPS Patio) August 29- Meet Industry professionals, learn the current state of job opportunities in oil/gas sector, resumé review by industry professionals and panel discussion: 4-6 PM (KWL 100) August 30- Poster and networking session: 5-6.30 PM (Reception at EEPS Patio) Make the most out of AAPG RIGS 2018!

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September 2018

Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Jess Adkins – Caltech

September 6, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm CDT

Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Jess Adkins - Caltech Abstract Title:  Calcium Carbonate Dissolution in Seawater Abstract:  Pending

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Current Research in EEPS Seminar: James Gaherty – Lamont-Doherty Columbia

September 13, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm CDT

Current Research in EEPS Seminar: James Gaherty - Lamont-Doherty Columbia Abstract Title:  An ocean-bottom view of mantle flow and lithosphere formation beneath Earth’s largest tectonic plate Abstract: Fifty years into the plate-tectonic era, Earth scientists struggle to constrain two fundamental components of the tectonic model: (1) what processes control the rheology (i.e. weakness) of plate boundaries?; and (2) what is the nature and scale of the mantle convection processes that drive the plates? Ocean-bottom seismic (OBS) instrumentation deployed in the deep ocean basins provide an exceptional new…

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Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Bob Nowack – Purdue University

September 20, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm CDT

Current Research in EEPS Seminar:  Robert L. Nowack Dept. of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences Abstract Title:  Virtual Green’s Functions from Seismic Redatuming, Interferometry and Noise Abstract: In this talk, I describe the estimation of virtual Green’s functions from seismic redatuming, interferometry and noise.   Using interferometry, the Green’s function can be obtained by cross-correlating seismic signals recorded at two receivers where one of the receivers is converted into a virtual source, but this assumes that sources occur along the surrounding…

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Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Patrick Fulton – Texas A&M University

September 27, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm CDT

Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Patrick Fulton - Texas A&M University Abstract Title:   Insights into Earthquake Physics from Heat and Fluids in Faults Abstract: Subsurface hydrogeologic processes and conditions can have a direct effect on the strength and stability of faults. Interestingly, in return, fault slip behavior can influence hydrogeologic properties and conditions.  Here I discuss ongoing explorations of these relationships, by myself and colleagues, that are providing new insight into rapid yet silent stressers to fault zones. For example,…

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October 2018

Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Paul (Mitch) Harris – Adjunct Professor

October 2, 2018 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm CDT

Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Paul (Mitch) Harris - Adjunct Professor Abstract Title: Reservoir Implications of Facies and Diagenetic Variability in an Oolitic Grainstone Abstract: The Miami oolite (MO) of South Florida is representative of a grainstone-rich reservoir layer (high-frequency sequence) that has been surficially karsted (eogenetic karst), and therefore may be considered an analog for subsurface examples with “high” matrix porosity-permeability and localized touching-vug porosity. The deposit can potentially serve to illustrate heterogeneity in this type of reservoir, as…

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Current Research in EEPS Seminar: An Yin – UCLA

October 4, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm CDT

Current Research in EEPS Seminar: An Yin - UCLA Abstract Title:  Water hammers tectonic tremors during slow earthquakes at plate Abstract: In this talk I show that rapid (~100 km/hour) dip-parallel (= slip-parallel) migration of tectonic tremors at seismic-aseismic transition depths (15-55 km) along a subduction shear zone can result from pressure-wave propagation in an anisotropic viscoplastic shear zone. The shear-zone anisotropy is characterized by widely spaced (>10s km) slip-parallel conduits composed of high-strength and high-permeability brittle mafic rocks embedded…

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Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Allan Rubin – Princeton University

October 11, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm CDT

Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Allan Rubin - Princeton University   Abstract Title: "What is this thing called tremors?" Abstract: Nearly two decades after the discovery of tectonic tremor during slow slip in subduction zones, we still don't have a good physical picture of what the tremor source looks like.  Tremor is interpreted as consisting wholly or in large part of Low Frequency Earthquakes (LFEs), events with typical magnitudes of 1 to 2 but durations roughly 10 times longer than regular…

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Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Emily Montgomery-Brown – USGS

October 18, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm CDT

Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Emily Montgomery-Brown - USGS Abstract Title:  Deformation of the 2018 Kilauea Volcano eruption Abstract:  Pending

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Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Mathieu Lapotre – Harvard University

October 25, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm CDT

Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Mathieu Lapotre - Harvard University Abstract Title: Paleoenvironmental constraints from quantitative sedimentology and geomorphology: Canyon erosion and sand-ripple formation on Mars Abstract: The geologic records of terrestrial planets in our Solar System attest to the volatility of habitability. The history of Mars, in particular, is one of dramatic change that transformed a hospitable environment into the barren land we know today. Deciphering Mars’ geologic past using data from orbiting and landed spacecraft requires using and…

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November 2018

Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Markus Kleber – Oregon State University

November 1, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm CDT

Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Markus Kleber - Oregon State University Abstract Title:  Carbon oxidation state and the bioenergetics of soil organic matter decomposition Abstract: The mechanisms governing the decomposition of organic matter are of continued interest to the scientific community. Historically, some forms of organic matter have been assumed to possess the property of  “intrinsic resistance” to decomposition, and this property has frequently been used to explain the slow decomposition of such compounds. I will introduce a number of…

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Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Simone Marchi – Southwest Research Institute (SWRI)

November 8, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm CST

Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Simone Marchi - Southwest Research Institute (SWRI) Abstract Title:  Earth's earliest evolution: Fire from above, fire from below   Abstract: In the aftermath of the giant collision resulting in the formation of the Moon, about 4.5 billion years ago, the Earth experienced a protracted time of bombardment by leftover planetesimals. In this talk I will present a new bombardment model of the Hadean Earth that has been calibrated using existing lunar and terrestrial geochemical data. We…

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Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Chris Poulsen – University of Michigan

November 15, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm CST

Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Chris Poulsen - University of Michigan Abstract Title: Past extreme warm climates and their implications for future climate sensitivity   Abstract: The early Eocene and mid-Cretaceous were periods of extremely warm climate with no evidence of polar ice. The extreme warmth of both periods has been attributed to higher greenhouse gas concentrations, making them analogues for our future high-CO2 world. Climate models with prescribed estimates of past high carbon dioxide levels have been unable to reproduce…

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Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Zhongwen Zhan – Caltech

November 29, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm CST

Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Zhongwen Zhan - Caltech Abstract Title:  Trigger and rupture: a dual-mechanism hypothesis for deep earthquakes Abstract: It has been about 90 years since the discovery of deep earthquakes, and their mechanisms remain unclear. On one hand, they appear to be similar to shallow earthquakes as shear dislocations with diverse rupture properties. On the other hand, they should not exist given the pressure and temperature condition. In this talk, I will review recent observations about deep…

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January 2019

Current Research in EEPS Seminar – Boda Liu – Department of Earth, Environmental and Planetary Sciences, Brown University

January 17 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm CST

Current Research in EEPS Seminar - Boda Liu - Department of Earth, Environmental and Planetary Sciences, Brown University Title: Transport and fractionation of trace elements during melt migration   Abstract: The topic of this seminar is the effect of melt migration on the transport and fractionation of chemicals in rocky planets. The motivation has two-folds: (1) melt migration is an important step in the cycle of life-essential elements; (2) rock samples as products of melt migration contain information about the…

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Current Research in EEPS Seminar – Dr. Jonathan Ajo-Franklin – Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

January 22 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm CST

Current Research in EEPS Seminar - Dr. Jonathan Ajo-Franklin - Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory   Title: Probing Subsurface Fracture Dynamics Using Continuous Active Source Seismic Monitoring (CASSM) Abstract: Induced fractures exert a dominant control on the permeability and long-term performance of engineered subsurface systems including enhanced geothermal energy production, unconventional oil & gas fields, and certain classes of environmental remediation problems. Despite this fact, the spatial distribution of fluid-conductive fractures and their behavior over time are poorly constrained by existing…

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Current Research in EEPS Seminar – Jessie K. Pearl – Department of Geosciences, University of Arizona

January 22 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm CST

Current Research in EEPS Seminar - Jessie K. Pearl - Department of Geosciences, University of Arizona

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February 2019

Current Research in EEPS Seminar – Paul Johnson, Los Alamos National Laboratory

February 5 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm CST

Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Paul Johnson, Las Alamos National Laboratory   "Machine Learning Applied to Continuous Geophysical Data" Machine learning (ML) has been applied to a number of problems in geoscience for decades. Applications used only portions of available data due in part to limited data and computing power. For instance, considerable work has been done using earthquake catalogs. Catalogs are assembled by hand or in some automated manner applying classical data processing techniques. Thus, out of both necessity and…

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Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Ayla Pamukcu – Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute

February 14 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm CST

Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Ayla Pamukcu - Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute "Understanding the what, when, where, and why of supereruptions" Supereruptions are gigantic volcanic eruptions (≥450 km3 of magma) the likes of which we have never witnessed. Yet, this does not mean that we will never experience one, and such enormous eruptions have the potential to wreak havoc on life, infrastructure, travel, and the environment. Consequently, it is critical that we study past supereruptions to understand how, when, where,…

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Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Ingrid Johanson – Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

February 21 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm CST

Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Ingrid Johanson - Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Integrating diverse geodetic data to understand the 2018 Kīlauea eruption and earthquake sequence. The 2018 eruption and earthquake sequence at Kīlauea Volcano produced deformation throughout the volcano and is unprecedented in the last two centuries of its history. After the major part of the eruption finished in early August, 35.5 km2 of land had been inundated by lava, Kilauea’s summit had dropped over 500 meters at its deepest point,…

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Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Dr. Christopher Fedo – University of Tennessee

February 22 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm CST

Transport: the overlooked component in shaping sediment composition

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Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Clara Blättler – University of Chicago

February 28 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm CST

Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Clara Blättler - University of Chicago Reinterpreting the rock record of carbonates: Marine carbonates provide one of the most important archives of the Earth's surface environment. Interpreting this record requires distinguishing between local versus global effects and addressing the diagenetic history of samples, both of which can be very challenging. I will present new isotopic tools to help resolve questions surrounding the creation, preservation, and representativeness of geochemical signals in carbonates. This work forms the…

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March 2019

Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Andrew Dessler – Texas A&M University

March 7 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm CST

Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Andrew Dessler - Texas A&M University Adventures in estimating climate sensitivity Climate sensitivity (usually defined as the equilibrium warming in response to doubled CO2) is one of the most important and uncertain parameters in climate science.  I will review the history of estimates of the quantity and explain why internal variability makes it hard to estimate this quantity from observations.  I will then show a new estimate that uses observations of internal variability of the…

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Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Gregory Dick – University of Michigan

March 21 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm CDT

Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Gregory Dick - University of Michigan Longer days for more oxygen?  What modern cyanobacterial mats tell us about the oxygenation of Earth’s atmosphere. Plentiful oxygen (O2) is critical for life as we know it.  However, Earth’s atmosphere was not always rich in O2 as it is today; for the majority of Earth’s history there was not enough O2 to support animal life.  Thus, the story of how Earth attained it’s O2 is the story of…

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Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Dr. Sandra Kirtland-Turner – University of California, Riverside

March 28 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm CDT

Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Dr. Sandra Kirtland-Turner - University of California, Riverside Comparison between modern and ancient timescales of CO2 release through constraints on the onset duration of the Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM, ~56 Ma) provides a test case for investigating how the Earth system responds to rapid greenhouse-gas driven warming. Arguably the most important metric for relating the PETM to the modern is the rate of carbon emissions during the PETM onset, which…

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April 2019

Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Steven Roecker – Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

April 4 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm CDT

Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Steven Roecker - Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute The Nature of the Subduction Wedge in an Erosive Margin: Insights from the Analysis of Aftershocks of the 2015 Mw 8.3 Illapel Earthquake Beneath the Chilean Coastal Range Aftershocks of large earthquakes generally are presumed to be caused by asperities or other sources of residual strain on the mainshock rupture surface, and analyses of these events typically focus on how strain is released on that surface. Moreover, the rate of…

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For outside visitors, the best way to get to our department is to come in on Rice Blvd and turn into entrance 20 (intersection of Rice and Kent St.). At the stop sign, you will see a visitor parking lot.  From there, walk east to the department.  The google map below shows exactly where our building is.