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Keith Weiss Geological Laboratories – Room 100

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February 2019

Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Ingrid Johanson – Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

February 21 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm CST

Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Ingrid Johanson - Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Integrating diverse geodetic data to understand the 2018 Kīlauea eruption and earthquake sequence. The 2018 eruption and earthquake sequence at Kīlauea Volcano produced deformation throughout the volcano and is unprecedented in the last two centuries of its history. After the major part of the eruption finished in early August, 35.5 km2 of land had been inundated by lava, Kilauea’s summit had dropped over 500 meters at its deepest point,…

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Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Clara Blättler – University of Chicago

February 28 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm CST

Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Clara Blättler - University of Chicago Reinterpreting the rock record of carbonates: Marine carbonates provide one of the most important archives of the Earth's surface environment. Interpreting this record requires distinguishing between local versus global effects and addressing the diagenetic history of samples, both of which can be very challenging. I will present new isotopic tools to help resolve questions surrounding the creation, preservation, and representativeness of geochemical signals in carbonates. This work forms the…

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March 2019

Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Andrew Dessler – Texas A&M University

March 7 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm CST

Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Andrew Dessler - Texas A&M University Adventures in estimating climate sensitivity Climate sensitivity (usually defined as the equilibrium warming in response to doubled CO2) is one of the most important and uncertain parameters in climate science.  I will review the history of estimates of the quantity and explain why internal variability makes it hard to estimate this quantity from observations.  I will then show a new estimate that uses observations of internal variability of the…

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Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Gregory Dick – University of Michigan

March 21 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm CDT

Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Gregory Dick - University of Michigan Longer days for more oxygen?  What modern cyanobacterial mats tell us about the oxygenation of Earth’s atmosphere. Plentiful oxygen (O2) is critical for life as we know it.  However, Earth’s atmosphere was not always rich in O2 as it is today; for the majority of Earth’s history there was not enough O2 to support animal life.  Thus, the story of how Earth attained it’s O2 is the story of…

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Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Dr. Sandra Kirtland-Turner – University of California, Riverside

March 28 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm CDT

Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Dr. Sandra Kirtland-Turner - University of California, Riverside Comparison between modern and ancient timescales of CO2 release through constraints on the onset duration of the Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM, ~56 Ma) provides a test case for investigating how the Earth system responds to rapid greenhouse-gas driven warming. Arguably the most important metric for relating the PETM to the modern is the rate of carbon emissions during the PETM onset, which…

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April 2019

Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Steven Roecker – Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

April 4 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm CDT

Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Steven Roecker - Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute The Nature of the Subduction Wedge in an Erosive Margin: Insights from the Analysis of Aftershocks of the 2015 Mw 8.3 Illapel Earthquake Beneath the Chilean Coastal Range Aftershocks of large earthquakes generally are presumed to be caused by asperities or other sources of residual strain on the mainshock rupture surface, and analyses of these events typically focus on how strain is released on that surface. Moreover, the rate of…

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For outside visitors, the best way to get to our department is to come in on Rice Blvd and turn into entrance 20 (intersection of Rice and Kent St.). At the stop sign, you will see a visitor parking lot.  From there, walk east to the department.  The google map below shows exactly where our building is.