Posts

PNAS: Climate models can correctly simulate the continuum of global-average temperature variability

Feng Zhu, Julien Emile-Geay, Nicholas P. McKay, Gregory J. Hakim, Deborah Khider, Toby R. Ault, Eric J. Steig, Sylvia Dee, and James W. Kirchner
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 116 (2019) 8728-8733.

DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1809959116

Significance

Climate models are foundational to formulations of climate policy and must successfully reproduce key features of the climate system. The temporal spectrum of observed global surface temperature is one such critical benchmark. This spectrum is known to obey scaling laws connecting astronomical forcings, from orbital to annual scales. We provide evidence that the current hierarchy of climate models is capable of reproducing the increase in variance in global-mean temperature at low frequencies. We suggest that successful climate predictions at decadal-to-centennial horizons hinge critically on the accuracy of initial and boundary conditions, particularly for the deep ocean state.

Abstract

Climate records exhibit scaling behavior with large exponents, resulting in larger fluctuations at longer timescales. It is unclear whether climate models are capable of simulating these fluctuations, which draws into question their ability to simulate such variability in the coming decades and centuries. Using the latest simulations and data syntheses, we find agreement for spectra derived from observations and models on timescales ranging from interannual to multimillennial. Our results confirm the existence of a scaling break between orbital and annual peaks, occurring around millennial periodicities. That both simple and comprehensive ocean–atmosphere models can reproduce these features suggests that long-range persistence is a consequence of the oceanic integration of both gradual and abrupt climate forcings. This result implies that Holocene low-frequency variability is partly a consequence of the climate system’s integrated memory of orbital forcing. We conclude that climate models appear to contain the essential physics to correctly simulate the spectral continuum of global-mean temperature; however, regional discrepancies remain unresolved. A critical element of successfully simulating suborbital climate variability involves, we hypothesize, initial conditions of the deep ocean state that are consistent with observations of the recent past.

QSR: Evidence of Ice Age humans in eastern Beringia suggests early migration to North America

Richard S. Vachula, Yongsong Huang, William M. Longo, Sylvia G. Dee, William C. Daniels, and James M. Russell

Quant. Sci. Rev. 205 (2019) 35-44.

DOI: 10.1016/j.quascirev.2018.12.003

 

Abstract

Our understanding of the timing and pathway of human arrival to the Americas remains an important and polarizing topic of debate in archaeology and anthropology. Traditional consensus, supported by archaeological and paleoenvironmental data, favors a ‘swift peopling’ of the Americas from Asia via the Bering Land Bridge during the last Glacial termination. More recent genetic data and archaeological finds have challenged this view, proposing the ‘Beringian standstill hypothesis’ (BSH), wherein a population of proto-Americans migrated from Asia during, or even prior to the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and lived in Beringia for thousands of years before their eventual spread across the American continents. Using a sediment archive from Lake E5 (68.641667° N, 149.457706° W), located on Alaska’s North Slope, we present new data supporting the BSH and shedding new light on the environmental impact of these early American populations. Fecal biomarkers support human presence in the environs of the lake, and our data demonstrate elevated biomass burning in this region during the last Glacial. Elevated burning defies the expectation that natural fires would be less frequent in the Arctic during the last Glacial, thereby suggesting human ignition as the likely culprit. Our data shed new light on the pathway and timing of human migration to the Americas and demonstrate the possibility of the sustainable coexistence of humans and the Ice Age megafauna in Beringia prior to their extinction.