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November 14 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm CST

Current Research in EEPS Seminar: Dr. Tim Goudge – University of Texas at Austin

Characterizing the Incision of Ancient Lake Outlet Canyons on Mars

Some of the best geologic evidence for liquid water on the ancient surface of Mars is a record of paleolake basins. More than 200 of these basins have an outlet canyon that drained the lake, which requires a transition from an originally enclosed topographic basin (typically defined by an impact crater) to an open lake hydrologically connected to the exterior terrain via incision of an outlet. In this talk I will present our analyses of the topography and geometry of martian paleolake outlet canyons to test between two endmember hypotheses for their origin – rapid outlet incision by catastrophic lake overflow flooding vs. gradual outlet incision from long-term outflow that balanced inflow to the lake. Included in this analysis is a comparison of our results to observations of breached lake basins on Earth to test whether observed geometric scaling relationships are consistent across the two planets. Finally, some of the largest valley systems on Mars have main stems that are paleolake outlet canyons, and I will also present work to examine how the martian landscape responded to the incision of these large canyons.

Details

Date:
November 14
Time:
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Venue

Keith-Weiss Geological Laboratories – Room 100
Rice University, 6100 Main Street, MS 126
Houston, TX 77005 United States
+ Google Map
Phone:
713-348-4880
Website:
earthscience.rice.edu

Details

Date:
November 14
Time:
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Venue

Keith-Weiss Geological Laboratories – Room 100
Rice University, 6100 Main Street, MS 126
Houston, TX 77005 United States
+ Google Map
Phone:
713-348-4880
Website:
earthscience.rice.edu

For outside visitors, the best way to get to our department is to come in on Rice Blvd and turn into entrance 20 (intersection of Rice and Kent St.). At the stop sign, you will see a visitor parking lot.  From there, walk east to the department.  The google map below shows exactly where our building is.