Loading Events

« All Events

  • This event has passed.

November 18 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm CST

Current Research in EEPS: Dr. Zachary E. Ross, California Institute of Technology

Evidence for Latent Crustal Fluid Injection Transients in Southern California From Long-Duration Earthquake Swarms

Earthquake swarms are manifestations of aseismic driving processes deep in the crust. We examine the spatiotemporal distribution of aseismic processes in Southern California using a 12-years catalog of swarms derived with deep learning algorithms. In a core portion of the plate boundary region, which is not associated with elevated heat flow, we identify 92 long-duration swarms ranging from 6 months to 7 years that constitute 26.4% of the total seismicity. We find that 53% of the swarms exhibit ultra-slow diffusive patterns with propagating backfronts, consistent with expectations for natural fluid injection processes. The chronology of the swarms indicates that the aseismic driving processes were active at all times during 2008–2020. The observations challenge common views about the nature of swarms, which would characterize any one of these sequences as anomalous. The regional prevalence of these sequences suggests that transient fluid injection processes play a key role in crustal fluid transport.

Details

Date:
November 18
Time:
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm CST
Event Categories:
,

Venue

Keith-Weiss Geological Laboratories – Room 100
Rice University, 6100 Main Street, MS 126
Houston, TX 77005 United States
+ Google Map
Phone:
713-348-4880
Website:
earthscience.rice.edu

Details

Date:
November 18
Time:
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm CST
Event Categories:
,

Venue

Keith-Weiss Geological Laboratories – Room 100
Rice University, 6100 Main Street, MS 126
Houston, TX 77005 United States
+ Google Map
Phone:
713-348-4880
Website:
earthscience.rice.edu

For outside visitors, the best way to get to our department is to come in on Rice Blvd and turn left into entrance 20 (intersection of Rice and Kent St.). At the stop sign, you will see a visitor parking lot on your right.  From there, walk east to the department.  The google map below shows exactly where our building is.