Mars geologist available to comment on NASA’s Curiosity rover findings

David Ruth
713-348-6327
david@rice.edu

http://news.rice.edu/2018/06/05/mars-geologist-available-to-comment-on-nasas-curiosity-rover-findings/

HOUSTON – (June 5, 2018) – Rice University planetary science expert Kirsten Siebach is available through June 7, when NASA will announce new findings from its Mars Curiosity rover.

Photo courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

According to a media advisory, NASA and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) are inviting the media and public to ask questions during a live event at 1 p.m. CDT June 7. The briefing will be available online on NASA Television and NASA’s website.

Siebach, who is a self-described Martian geologist, is an assistant professor in Rice’s Department of Earth, Environmental and Planetary Science. Her work focuses on understanding the history of water interacting with sediments on Mars and early Earth through analysis of sedimentary rock textures and chemistry. She is currently a member of the Science and Operations Teams for the Mars Exploration Rovers and the Mars Science Laboratory.

Members of the news media who would like to interview Siebach should contact David Ruth, director of national media relations at Rice, at david@rice.edu or 713-348-6327.

Rice University has a VideoLink ReadyCam TV interview studio. ReadyCam is capable of transmitting broadcast-quality standard-definition and high-definition video directly to all news media organizations around the world 24/7.

Advocates For Science

From a steadily growing interest by the scientific community along with increased demand by educators and policy makers, science communication has become the need of the hour. The American Geophysical Union (AGU)  launched the Voices for Science Program to help the geoscience community meet those needs. The program aims to help train scientists from all stages in their careers to be better science communicators and advocates for public engagement.

With two different tracks, communications and policy, the Voices for Science program provides the opportunity to actively participate and explore different facets of science communication. Only 30 individuals were chosen  from a pool of 100 candidates to be a part of the inaugural program. Doctoral candidate Sriparna Saha has been selected as a part of the initial cohort for the communications track.

Read about the Voices for Science Program in the following article published in EOS: